UK weather forecast LIVE: 5in SNOW to fall as Britain is lashed with torrential rain, harsh winds & flooding from TODAY

FLOODING is expected to hit Britain in the coming days as an Arctic blast edges closer – bringing with it heavy rain, gale force winds and freezing overnight temperatures.

Yesterday saw torrential rain sweeping across the country, with more wet weather set for this evening as a dreary January well and truly sets in.

A patchwork of drizzle, dry spells and even some sun has been seen today – with extreme weather in some parts.

For today, a Met Office forecast says: "Mostly cloudy, cloud thick enough for some rain or drizzle at times, mainly in the north and west. Mostly dry in the southeast where some brighter spells. Milder than Sunday."

.Read our weather live blog for the latest news and forecasts

  • Joseph Gamp

    Manchester weather forecast for today

    Generally cloudy throughout with some rain and drizzle from time to time.

    Becoming murky over the hills with some mist and fog in places.

    Light winds and feeling mild. Maximum temperature 10 °C.

  • Joseph Gamp

    London weather forecast for today

    Cold, cloudy morning.

    A few spots of light rain or drizzle possible, becoming slightly more widespread and persistent across western parts through the afternoon.

    Some eastern parts staying dry, however. Maximum temperature 9 °C.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Met Office outlook for today

    Mostly cloudy with some rain or drizzle at times, particularly in the northwest where some heavier rain likely.

    Much milder than recently with some strong winds in the far north.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Weather outlook for Tuesday to Thursday

    The Met Office has offered a short summary into the weather for next week.

    It predicts how there will be “cloud and rain for England and Wales Tuesday, clearing southeast; sunny spells elsewhere with a few showers far northwest”.

    The agency added it will be “settled and mostly dry Wednesday onwards, with overnight frost and fog”.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Coldest January on record in the UK

    Leading bookmaker Coral has slashed the odds to 6-4 (from 3-1) for this month to end as the coldest January on record in the UK, as the latest forecasts point to falling temperatures from Wednesday.

    The firm go 2-1 for this winter to be the coldest ever in the UK.

    “We’ve enjoyed some unseasonable mild temperatures over the last few days but that is set to come to a crashing end later this week. With snow and freezing temperatures on their way, we have slashed the odds in half on this month ending as a record cold January,” said Coral’s John Hill.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Cold weather payments

    Here is the full list of postcodes that qualify for the payments.

    Aviemore

    • AB37
    • IV13
    • PH19-26

    Braemar

    • AB35-36
    • PH10-11
    • PH18

    Aboyne

    • AB30-34
    • AB38
    • AB51-55
    • DD8-9

    Loch Glascarnoch

    • IV4
    • IV6
    • IV7
    • IV14
    • IV16
    • IV23-24
    • IV63

    Three tips to know before driving in snow and ice

    Driving expert Jack Cousens, head of roads policy at the AA, has some useful advice.

    He said drivers must take it slow and leave plenty of space for the car ahead in case they skid off the road.

    And with motorways expected to be busier than ever as Brits rush to celebrate a family Christmas for the first time in two years, staying out of danger is extremely important.

    Here are Jack’s top tips:

    • Make space, it’s not a race
    • Slow and steady
    • Beware of ‘black ice’

    End of January outlook

    Through the rest of January, a continuation of the rather changeable regime is expected with spells of wet and windy weather interspersed by drier, brighter periods.

    Temperatures are likely to remain close to or slightly above average due to a mixture of mild spells and shorter-lived colder periods.

    These shorter-lived colder periods may still allow for some snow, but this will typically fall over hills in the north.

    Towards the end of this period, there is a tentative sign of more settled spells developing, particularly across the south which would increase the chance of overnight frost and fog here.

    Make your car visible in poor winter weather

    You can be fined up to £1,000 for failing to switch your car lights on when you’re driving.

    Make sure they’re all working before you set out on your journey, and turn them on if you have to get out to clear snow.

    If you use fog lights, remember to switch them off when visibility improves so they don’t dazzle other drivers or obscure your brake lights.

    • Joseph Gamp

      How to stay warm when outside

      With the weather getting chillier and frostier, you’ll want to wrap up warm.

      Here are some good tips for staying all snugly and cosy when outdoors:

      1. Prewarm your clothes.
      2. Invest in some quality thermals.
      3. Fleece leggings.
      4. Hand warmers.
      5. Cover every inch of skin.
      6. Eat fatty foods.
      7. Thermal flask.
      8. Keep moving.
      9. Keep hydrated.
      10. Keep your head covered.
      11. Tactical scarf-wearing – including keeping your nose and mouth covered
    • Joseph Gamp

      This month will see drop in temperatures, says Met Office expert

      Met Office forecaster Craig Snell said the average temperature in December and the beginning of January is usually around 7C or 8C, with the warmer weather due to a south-westerly wind making its way across the country.

      The higher temperatures are usually localised, but “plenty of places” have seen highs of 15C over December.

      However, he added that January could see a drop in temperatures because of an Arctic chill sweeping through from next week.

    • Joseph Gamp

      What is a Thundersnow?

      It is essentially a thunderstorm in cold weather.

      If it’s cold enough then instead of rain, the thunderstorms produce snow.

      This, along with the usual thunder and lightning is called a thundersnow.

      It is often very atmospheric.

      Th snow dampens the sound of the thunder and reflects the lightning making it even brighter.

    • Joseph Gamp

      How cold does it have to get in order to be sent home?

      There isn’t a set temperature where employers have to send their employees home because it’s too cold.

      And since October 2012, there’s no minimum temperatures in English schools, either.

      The School Premises (England) Regulations 2012 don’t specify a safe classroom temperature, although the National Education Union advises a minimum of 18C.

      In the workplace, it’s the employer’s responsibility to ensure that the workplace has additional heating if the temperatures do get too cold.

      Employers are recommended to include flexible working hours or rotas to help reduce the effects of a cold snap – but they don’t have to.

      Kate Palmer, head of advisory at employment law consultancy Peninsula, told The Sun an employer has no obligation to pay an employee if they fail to turn up for work because:

      1. The weather is bad
      2. Public transport is not running
      3. They miss hours because they turned up late

      Plus, employees do not have a legal right to be paid in the event they take an emergency day off with their children.

    • Joseph Gamp

      When is it too cold to go to work? (Continued…)

      Employers are not required to pay employees if they cannot get to work in bad weather, according to government rights.

      You could be asked to work from home, but if this isn’t possible you may be asked to take unpaid or annual leave.

      In the workplace, the mercury shouldn’t dip below 16C and employers should try to increase temperature in the office or workplace.

      The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) states that a workplace should provide “reasonable comfort”.

      Its Workplace Regulations 1999 state employers should “assess risks to health and safety and act where necessary (i.e. if the workplace temperature drops below the minimum guideline or if it is felt the temperature is too high)”.

    • Joseph Gamp

      When is it too cold to go to work?

      Snow and ice have reappeared across Britain after a record mild spell to start the new year.

      And though everyone loves a snow day, there’s unfortunately no guarantee of a day off school or work just because it’s snowing.

      There is also no specific law around minimum or maximum working temperatures, although there are guidelines.

      If it is safe and reasonable to travel to work, then you should do so.

      But if it isn’t safe, contact your employer and check the company handbook.

      Keep in mind that government guidance in all four UK nations currently advises you should work from home if it’s practical, too.

    • Joseph Gamp

      Odds SLASHED on January being coldest EVER

      This month looks set to go down as the coldest on record, according to Ladbrokes. 

      Having been a 5/2 shot at the back end of last year, the bookies now make it just 2/1 for January to break records as the coldest EVER. 

      Alex Apati of Ladbrokes said: “There’s an increasing chance we’ll be wrapping up and strapping in for a record-breaking cold January, as far as the latest odds are concerned.”

    • Joseph Gamp

      What to do if you find yourself aquaplaning

      Aquaplaning – skidding on water – occurs when a wedge of water forms in front of the tyre and lifts it up off the road surface.

      If you feel your car losing grip with the road, gently ease off the accelerator but don’t brake.

      Have a firm grip of the steering wheel and be sure not to make any sudden steering actions.

      The car will eventually regain its grip as water clears from the road.

    • Louis Allwood

      When is it too cold to go to work? (Continued…)

      Employers are not required to pay employees if they cannot get to work in bad weather, according to government rights.

      You could be asked to work from home, but if this isn’t possible you may be asked to take unpaid or annual leave.

      In the workplace, the mercury shouldn’t dip below 16C and employers should try to increase temperature in the office or workplace.

      The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) states that a workplace should provide “reasonable comfort”.

      Its Workplace Regulations 1999 state employers should “assess risks to health and safety and act where necessary (i.e. if the workplace temperature drops below the minimum guideline or if it is felt the temperature is too high)”.

    • Louis Allwood

      When is it too cold to go to work?

      Snow and ice have reappeared across Britain after a record mild spell to start the new year.

      And though everyone loves a snow day, there’s unfortunately no guarantee of a day off school or work just because it’s snowing.

      There is also no specific law around minimum or maximum working temperatures, although there are guidelines.

      If it is safe and reasonable to travel to work, then you should do so.

      But if it isn’t safe, contact your employer and check the company handbook.

      Keep in mind that government guidance in all four UK nations currently advises you should work from home if it’s practical, too.

    • Louis Allwood

      14th to 23rd of January forecast

      A continuation of largely settled conditions is most likely as we head into the middle of January with high pressure in charge across the south of the country.

      Most areas will be dry with any spells of rain and stronger winds likely to be restricted to northern parts of the country.

      The settled weather will bring widespread overnight frost as well as fog patches, these sometimes freezing.

      Amounts of sunshine are uncertain with areas of fog and low cloud potentially lingering all day in places, especially in the south.

      How long the predominantly settled conditions persist is uncertain with an increasing chance of some unsettled spells returning to many parts as we head towards the end of the period.

    • Louis Allwood

      Edinburgh evening forecast

      Dry this evening, some frost and freezing fog patches.

      Freshening southerly winds will bring a little light rain to Galloway later, but staying dry elsewhere.

      Minimum temperature -2 °C.

    • Louis Allwood

      Flood alerts

      The flood alerts are in place in for much of the South West, around Wolverhampton, Leeds, Norwich and Eastbourne.

      Frost and fog is set for the latter end of the week, with freezing fog rolling across England and Wales, a spokesperson for The Met Office said.

      The forecaster told The Sun: "We've seen pretty much an average start to the month in terms of rainfall, we're running at about 30 per cent of the average rainfall – we would usually expect to be at that value.

      "But high pressure building and fog will be the main problem.

      "It looks quite nice around the middle of the week, and Wednesday could be quite sunny – but there is an increasing risk developing of freezing fog on Thursday and Friday.

      "So that's fog with temperatures below freezing, and that could cause some disruption to travel and aviation, so there could be some disruption at airports, for example.

      "But there's no snow or particularly disruptive wind."

    • Louis Allwood

      24th January to 7th February forecast

      A more unsettled regime is most likely during late January and into early February with spells of wet and windy weather followed by brighter but showery interludes.

      Northwestern areas are likely to be wettest with southern and eastern areas seeing the best of any drier interludes.

      Overall temperatures are most likely to be near or a little above average though some colder interludes are possible.

      Snow could fall to lower levels at times in any colder interludes but is most likely over higher ground in the north.

    • Louis Allwood

      How to stay warm when outside

      With the weather getting chillier and frostier, you’ll want to wrap up warm.

      Here are some good tips for staying all snugly and cosy when outdoors:

      1. Prewarm your clothes.
      2. Invest in some quality thermals.
      3. Fleece leggings.
      4. Hand warmers.
      5. Cover every inch of skin.
      6. Eat fatty foods.
      7. Thermal flask.
      8. Keep moving.
      9. Keep hydrated.
      10. Keep your head covered.
      11. Tactical scarf-wearing – including keeping your nose and mouth covered
    • Louis Allwood

      21 Flood alerts across UK

      A total of 21 flood alerts are in place across England and Wales after heavy rainfall yesterday.

      It comes after drivers were urged to stay alert on the roads on Friday with ice warnings covering half the country.

      On Saturday, western Scotland experienced 46 mm of rain with more expected to hit.

      And a total of 18 flood alerts were put in place across England.

      The Environment Agency said: "Localised flooding from rivers and surface water is possible, but not expected across parts of England and Wales today.

      "Land, roads and some properties may flood and there may be travel disruption."

      Heavy and blustery showers are expected to fall overnight with the Met Office warning of possible hail and wintry conditions over some hills.

      The southwest is set to see the worst of the wind while cold and icy patches are possible up and down the country.

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