Thousands make up for lost time and hit the parties for Halloween

The Big Candy Apple! NYC goes wild for Halloween after COVID canceled 2020 fun, with tens of thousands dressing up and taking to city’s streets, bars and nightclubs to attend all night parties

  • New York City was buzzing with energy on Saturday night with thousands of people romping through the city streets to attend a variety of parties and clubs
  • People were seen throughout the city dressed up in a variety of costumes on the eve of Halloween dressed up as zombies, monsters, fairies, superheroes and even grapes
  • Some seemed to be simply strolling the streets in their elaborate costumes, while others seized the opportunity to party at bars and clubs
  • It was a welcome change from last year when gatherings were limited to just 10 people
  • Still, guests had to show their vaccination cards to get in to some of the clubs
  • The party was set to continue Sunday night with the annual Village Halloween Parade – which was canceled last year due to the pandemic 

Halloween came roaring back this year with thousands of people romping through New York City in a variety of costumes and attending a slew of parties Saturday night – something they couldn’t do last year under the city’s COVID restrictions.

All throughout the city people were dressed as zombies, monsters, fairies, superheroes and even grapes on Sunday, despite a rainy start to the holiday.

Some people were seen simply strolling through the streets in their elaborate costumes, while others tried to enter parties and bars.

Others who couldn’t quite face dressing up went for a stroll too, to admire the hard work and creativity of those making a night of it.  

It was a welcome change from last year, when the number of people who could attend a party was capped at just 10 people as the city topped a half-million confirmed COVID cases.

Michelle Rose dressed up as a Halloween bride and posed for photos in Times Square on the eve of Halloween

Two girls in inflatable alien costumes browsed through their phones on the eve of Halloween in Times Square on Saturday

A group of girls posed while waiting to cross the street in the West Village on Halloween eve

All throughout the city, people were dressed up in costumes as they went to parties and clubs for the holiday, with these revelers spotted at Times Square subway station 

A group of friends went as a bunch of grapes. They were seen standing in line for a night club on the eve of Halloween

A woman in a Tinkerbell fairy costume quietly exited a cab in Times Square Saturday night

Jack-o-lanterns were on display outside The Slaughtered Lamb Pub in the West Village

Parties were happening throughout the city, and in clubs like the Palladium in Times Square, where guests had to display their COVID vaccine cards to get in – in accordance with the city’s vaccine mandate, which requires people to be vaccinated against the virus for indoor activities.

Once they got inside, they were also checked by security.

Elsewhere, people in costumes lined up for their chance to get scared out of their minds at the Jekyll and Hyde haunted house. 

And others were seen simply strolling through Times Square – which appeared to be a major party spot Saturday night, the night before Halloween, as people took photos and descended on the area.

Some even took a quick break from all the partying to enjoy some food from the many food vendors that line the New York City streets. 

A werewolf sat quietly on the subway the night before Halloween

A Palladium security worker checked people’s COVID vaccine cards to grant them entry into a party

A couple went as Venom and Carnage from the movie Venom: Let there be Carnage

A father and son wore Jason masks and stood in front of a car covered in fake blood, with Pennywise the clown crawling out of it

A group of skeletons stood near a reflection of the American flag in Times Square

A man wearing face paint posed in Chelsea on his way to a party

The festivities are set to continue later on Sunday when the annual Village Halloween Parade returns to the streets of New York.

It was canceled last year due to the pandemic, and late last month, organizers warned that it may have to be canceled again due to a significant budget shortfall.

But fortunately UBS Financial Services Senior Vice President in Wealth Management Jason Feldman, and his wife, Missy, saved the day by donating enough money to keep the annual celebration afloat, according to ABC 7 News.

The theme this year is ‘Let’s Play,’ and is dedicated to all of the children of New York who did not get a proper Halloween last year.

People in costume tried to flag down a taxi in the West Village on Saturday night

A line formed outside the Jekyll and Hyde haunted house in the West Village, with a woman in camo print at a man dressed as a box of weed gummies among those excited about letting loose 

People in costumes stopped for a quick break from all the partying to enjoy some food from a halal cart

A woman dressed as a vampire had to be searched at a security checkpoint before entering the Palladium club in Times Square on Saturday night

Michelle Rose, dressed as a Halloween bride, blew her friends a kiss before entering the subway station in Times Square

‘Squid Game’ masks were sold on the streets in Chelsea on Saturday night for anyone left without a costume

The citywide jubilance comes amid a decrease in coronavirus cases across the five boroughs.

According to data from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the city had a 2.09 percent positivity rate with an average of 552 confirmed cases over the past week.

There were seven deaths reported and at least 23 people hospitalized with the virus.

But the Department of Health is reporting that all of these numbers continue to trend downwards, as 73 percent of eligible New Yorkers have had at least one dose of the COVID vaccine and 67 percent are fully vaccinated.

The situation is also looking up throughout the country.

As of Friday, there were 86,786 new cases and 1,773 new deaths, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control. 

In addition, 66 percent of all eligible Americans have received at least one dose of the COVID vaccine, and 57.9 percent are fully vaccinated. 

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