Seven in 10 American parents are radically changing their approach to their kid’s lunches and snacks this school year

A MAJORITY of American parents plan to switch up their approach when it comes to their children's school lunches and snacks this year, new research shows.

A study of 2,000 parents of school-aged children aimed to see how parents are approaching the new academic year during a time of constant change.

Research found that 70 percent of respondents plan to use "back to school" as a way to get their kids to eat healthier.

Nearly 80 percent of parents polled said they're planning to stock up on healthier snacks like granola bars (36 percent), trail mix (34 percent), hummus (33 percent), and veggie chips (33 percent).

Four in 10 parents surveyed are looking for ways to wean their kids off of the comfort food they fed them as the coronavirus pandemic and virtual leaning began.

Parents are so concerned about their children's health that 74 percent said they'll organize their snacks so that they're never short of healthy options.

To encourage healthy eating habits, 78 percent of parents will pre-plan their child's snacks and lunches regardless of whether they're back in the classroom or learning virtually.


Although there are still kinks to be worked out with virtual learning, half of the parents surveyed feel their kids can make better choices at home than at school.

Most caregivers expect this back-to-school season to be hectic (74 percent) and they fear lunch hour – 64 percent complain they're dreading becoming the "lunch lady" at home.

Roughly three in four of them also said they'll be limiting their kids' sugar intake.

While 74 percent of people surveyed said this school year will be more chaotic than years previous, four in five still plan on maintaining a daily routine with their kids despite the blitz.


Maintaining a sense of normalcy and structure is helpful for both parents and children, particularly when it comes to focus and rest.

Fifty-three percent of parents said a structured day makes their kids better behaved, while 69 percent said they're able to focus more on their schoolwork.

Almost half (48 percent) said their children get more quality shut-eye when they have a set routine to consistently follow.

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