Safety fears rise as e-scooter's with speeds of up to 72mph are sold

Safety fears rise as e-scooter that can go faster than the 70mph motorway speed limit are sold for up to £2,800 despite warnings they do not meet trading standards

  • Dr Scooter is selling 72mph, 7,000 watt Dokma Black Ninja scooter for £2,800
  • E-scooters can only be ridden on the road if hired through trial schemes in 50 towns and cities
  • Privately-owned e-scooters are restricted to private ground and riders must have at least a provisional driving licence

Super-powered e-scooters which can travel at up to 72mph are being sold by UK firms despite a warning they do not meet trading standards.

The vehicles are being marketed with scant reference to British law banning their use on public roads and pavements.

Dr Scooter, which trades online and through shops in London, is selling the 72mph, 7,000 watt Dokma Black Ninja scooter for £2,800. 

Dr Scooter, which trades online and through shops in London, is selling the 72mph, 7,000 watt Dokma Black Ninja scooter for £2,800

Under current laws, e-scooters can only be ridden on the road if hired through trial schemes in 50 towns and cities, subject to a 15.5mph speed limit. 

Privately-owned e-scooters are restricted to private ground.

The Department for Transport said ‘super-fast e-scooters do not meet any existing trading standard’. 

Dr Scooter was last night understood to be reviewing its website to add legal information. 

Under current laws, e-scooters can only be ridden on the road if hired through trial schemes in 50 towns and cities, subject to a 15.5mph speed limit

E-scooters could be let loose on the roads ‘within the next 12 months’ despite at least eight riders dying in accidents this year, it emerged this month.

Currently the vehicles are subject to a limited trial in public spaces.

They are only allowed for hire in London and a small number of provincial cities. Elsewhere, owners can only use them on private land.

Riders must also have at least a provisional driving licence. But the surging popularity of the £300 vehicles means they have become a common sight across the country regardless of the law. 

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