Russia accuses Finland of 'pushing above its weight'

Russia accuses Finland of ‘pushing above its weight’ as Putin’s EU ambassador vows to bolster their 800-mile-long border with the neighbouring country if it decides to join NATO

  • Russia said Finland was ‘pushing above its weight’ as it suggested joining NATO
  • Putin’s EU ambassador vowed to boost defences on the countries’ shared border
  • Vladimir Chizhov said if Finland joins there may be ‘military-technical measures’

Russia has accused Finland of ‘pushing above its weight’ as the country signalled its intention to join NATO.

Putin’s EU ambassador vowed to bolster defences on the Russia and Finland’s shared 800-mile-long border if it decided to join the alliance.

Vladimir Chizhov said if Finland joined it would lead to ‘certain military-technical measures, like improving or raising the degree of defence preparations along the Finnish border’.

A move would ‘certainly necessitate rethinking of Russian defence posture’ but not ‘necessarily [involve] troops and tanks, but certain preparations like radars, perhaps’, he told Sky News.

Reservists of the Karelia Brigade at a shooting practice during a defence exercise in Taipalsaari near Lappeenranta and close to the border with Russia, south-eastern Finland

Putin’s EU ambassador Vladimir Chizhov (pictured today) said if Finland joined NATO it would lead to ‘certain military-technical measures, like improving or raising the degree of defence preparations along the Finnish border’

A Leopard battle tank of the Armoured Brigade is seen during the Army mechanised exercise Arrow 22 exercise at the Niinisalo garrison in Kankaanp”, Western Finland, on May 4

Finnish soldiers take part in the Army mechanised exercise Arrow 22 exercise at the Niinisalo garrison in Kankaanpaa, Finland, May 4

Finland’s President Sauli Niinisto makes a point during a joint press conference with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland, Wednesday, May 11

A former British ambassador to Russia has said there may be ‘much more Russian nuclear deployment in the Baltic’ areas in response to Finland potentially becoming a NATO member in light of the war in Ukraine.

Sir Tony Brenton told BBC’s Newsnight programme the Kremlin may think ‘it expands their view of NATO as a threat to them’.

He said: ‘They will be very conscious especially as this war winds its way to a conclusion that their conventional forces have not produced the results they hoped for.

‘They will be increasingly inclined therefore to use their nuclear strength as a demonstration they need to be taken seriously.

‘I think we need to resign ourselves to the likelihood of much more Russian nuclear deployment in the Baltic area as a response to Finland’s accession to NATO, when it comes, and Sweden’s very likely one as well.’

Today, Finland announced it intends to start the formal application process to join the military pact, more than doubling NATO’s presence on Russia’s borders from 754 miles to 1,584 miles.

The decision is a spectacular backfire for despot Vladimir Putin, who invaded Ukraine in part through fears of Volodymyr Zelensky joining the US-led alliance.

It came as over the past 10 days, soldiers from Albania, France, Greece, Italy, North Macedonia, Montenegro, the UK and the US have taken part in the exercises in North Macedonia, which have included parachute jumps at several locations around the country.

NATO has put on a show of strength in Europe in a message to Vladimir Putin as 10,000 soldiers from 19 nations take part in war games across the continent

Italian paratroopers parachute after jumping from C-130 aircraft in today’s NATO drills

British soldiers participate in an exercise as NATO allied troops carry out Swift Response 22 exercises during a media open day at Krivolak army base, North Macedonia

A British Chinook helicopter transports a howitzer and a truck during the Swift Response 22 military exercise

Soldiers take part in the NATO military exercise ‘Flaming Sword 2022’ at a training range near the village Maisiejunai

NATO forces’ U.S. AH-64 Apache helicopters fly by during the NATO exercise ‘Swift Respone 22’ at the Krivolak Army Training Area, near Negotino

Recent exercises involved around soldiers from North Macedonia, Albania, Montenegro, Greece, Italy, as well as France, the UK and the US

British soldiers prepare for Swift Response 22 exercises carried out by NATO allied troops

North Macedonia formally joined NATO in March 2020. The small Balkan country of 1.8million people has an active military of about 8,000 personnel.

The purpose of the exercises is to showcase the ability for large ground combat operations for member states and allies.

Earlier, Russian state TV accused the US of erecting a ‘new iron curtain’ in Europe in a furious response to Finland announcing its intention to join NATO.

The ‘Swift Response 22’ exercises involve forces from the US, Britain, France, Italy and other allied nations and are taking place against the backdrop of Russian aggression against perceived Western expansion

NATO exercise ‘Swift Response 22’ is part of the exercise ‘DEFENDER EUROPE 22’ at the Krivolak Army Training Area

British soldiers attend the NATO exercise ‘Swift Response 22’ at the Krivolak Army Training Area, near Negotino

Spain’s F-18 jet fighter takes part in the NATO military exercise ‘Flaming Sword 2022’ at a training range near the village of Maisiejunai

Today, Finland announced it intends to start the formal application process to join the military pact, more than doubling NATO’s presence on Russia’s borders from 754 miles to 1,584 miles

British communications officers in North Macedonia take part in the NATO drills as a show of strength for the military alliance

Italian paratroopers jump from a C-130 aircraft as NATO allied troops carry out Swift Response 22 exercises

The exercises demonstrate the NATO states’ ability to deploy anywhere around the world and that its soldiers can operate together professionally and successfully

US Black Hawk helicopters take part in the Swift Response 22 military exercise at the Krivolak Military Training Center

This morning, president Sauli Niinisto and prime minister Sanna Marin said they want to join the security alliance ‘without delay’, with Sweden set to follow suit within days, drastically ramping up tensions between Russia and the West. 

The Kremlin had previously threatened it would secure ‘the entire destruction’ of the country and ‘the most undesirable consequences’, and today said it would ‘be forced to take retaliatory steps’, both ‘military-technical and other’.

A Number 10 spokesman said the UK is ‘fully committed to NATO’s open door policy’ and said the only threatening behaviour in Europe has been Russia’s invasion. 

When asked what he would say to Russia, Niinisto replied: ‘You caused this. Look in the mirror.’ 

After the announcement, Russian state TV’s Olga Skabeyeva said: ‘The main beneficiary here is America and Biden. And the main aim is a new iron curtain from the Barents to the Black Sea.’

Meanwhile Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said the move was ‘definitely’ a threat to Russia and warned it would make Europe more unstable. 

He said Finland had made ‘unfriendly steps’ against Russia and it was a cause for regret and a reason to impose a symmetrical response. 

Asked whether this presented a threat to Russia, Peskov said: ‘Definitely. NATO expansion does not make our continent more stable and secure.’

Sweden is expected to follow Finland with its own bid which could come as soon as next week, with a parliament debate on Monday followed by a special cabinet meeting where the formal decision to apply will be taken, Daily Expressen said.

The major policy shift was announced today in a joint statement by President Sauli Niinisto and Prime Minister Sanna Marin (pictured) today

President Sauli Niinisto and prime minister Sanna Marin released the anticipated statement this morning

Russian state TV has accused the US of erecting a ‘new iron curtain’ in Europe in response to the decision

Finland, which shares an 830-mile border and a difficult past with Russia, has previously remained outside NATO

Sauli Niinisto (pictured during a meeting with Boris Johnson yesterday) believes the move would strengthen Finland’s security

A special committee will announce Finland’s decision on a membership bid on Sunday although it could take until October before the country is formally admitted to the pact.

The major policy shift which completely rewrites Europe’s post WWII alignment comes a day after Boris Johnson signed security pacts with Helsinki and Stockholm pledging Britain would come to their aid if they come under Russian attack. 

In their statement today, Niinisto and Marin said: ‘Now that the moment of decision-making is near, we state our equal views, also for information to the parliamentary groups and parties. 

‘NATO membership would strengthen Finland’s security. As a member of NATO, Finland would strengthen the entire defence alliance.

‘Finland must apply for NATO membership without delay.

‘We hope that the national steps still needed to make this decision will be taken rapidly within the next few days.’

Finland, which shares an 830-mile border and a difficult past with Russia, has previously remained outside the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation to maintain friendly relations with its eastern neighbour.

Earlier this morning, former prime minister Alexander Stubb said: ‘I have been waiting for this day for 30 years.

‘Announcement on Finnish NATO membership imminent.’

Sweden is expected to imminently follow Finland with an application to join the Western military pact.

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