Nigeria-born convicted drug dealer is allowed to remain in the UK

Nigeria-born convicted drug dealer is allowed to remain in the UK because his stepdaughter is seeking gender reassignment surgery and needs ‘continuing support’ from him

  • Man, in his 30s, was given 27-month jail term for conspiring to supply cannabis 
  • The man said deportation would be ‘unduly harsh’ on his British family
  • His stepdaughter had been experiencing significant mental health difficulties 
  • She was also seeking gender reassignment and was ‘particularly close’ to him

A Nigeria-born convicted drug dealer has been allowed to remain in the UK to support his stepdaughter who is seeking gender reassignment surgery and has mental health difficulties.

The man, who is in his early 30s, had been given a 27-month jail term after being convicted of conspiring to supply cannabis seven years ago.  

Ministers said he should be automatically deported. But the man said that would be ‘unduly harsh’ on his British family.

He said his stepdaughter had been experiencing significant mental health difficulties and was in the process of seeking gender reassignment.

A Nigerian-born convicted drug dealer has been allowed to remain in the UK to support his stepdaughter who is seeking gender reassignment surgery and has mental health difficulties. An immigration tribunal ruled in his favour last in 2019, and a judge has now dismissed a Home Office (stock image, pictured) appeal

She needed a high level of support from her family and was ‘particularly close’ to him, the man claimed.

An immigration tribunal ruled in his favour last in 2019, and a judge has now dismissed a Home Office appeal.

The tribunal ruled that the man’s ‘continuing support’ was ‘essential’ to his stepdaughter’s ’emotional and psychological well-being’ and that the ‘impact of his deportation’ would be ‘unduly harsh’ on her.

Judge Gaenor Bruce has upheld that decision after concluding that lawyers representing the Home Office had not established that the tribunal decision was ‘flawed for error of law’.

Lawyers representing the Home Office had said the man’s wife could care for the children, as she had done while he was in jail.

The man, who is in his early 30s, had been given a 27-month jail term after being convicted of conspiring to supply cannabis seven years ago (stock image)

They argued that the best interests of a child should not be treated as routinely outweighing the ‘strong public interest’ in deportation.

The man said the distress which would be experienced by his stepdaughter if he was deported ‘elevated’ the case above the ‘commonplace’.

Judge Bruce, who published a ruling on Monday following an appeal tribunal hearing, also ruled that the man could not be named in media reports of the case.

She said the man was a ‘foreign criminal’ who would not ‘ordinarily attract any right to the protection of anonymity’.

But the judge said she was concerned that his children’s identities might become known if he was named.

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