'Ignored' Biggie murder evidence including 'Tupac killer' at after party & secret visit to Crips could help solve case

FIVE pieces of overlooked evidence surrounding the murder of Notorious B.I.G. – including the rapper's secret visit to a Crips neighborhood and an unidentified witness caught on camera, could be key to solving the case.

Other mysterious evidence includes how "self confessed Tupac killer" Keffe D was at the after party on the night of the drive-by shooting along with claims that the rapper – also known as Biggie Smalls – was actually under FBI surveillance in his last days.

This week would have marked the 49th birthday of rap icon Notorious B.I.G, whose March 9, 1997 murder in Los Angeles officially remains an unsolved crime.

The ‘Juicy’ rapper had earlier made his final public appearance, presenting an award at the Soul Train Music Awards, before he was brutally slayed the following night as he left an after-party outside the Petersen Automotive Museum.

The Los Angeles Police Department have the case as officially open, despite key law enforcement figures identifying Bloods gang member Wardell “Poochie” Fouse as the killer. Fouse was shot dead in 2003.

However, documentary maker and Biggie expert Mike Dorsey told The Sun that many aspects of the case remain a mystery and says there are five peculiar matters surrounding Biggie’s murder that have never been fully investigated or explained.


Dorsey, who created Murder Rap: Inside the Biggie and Tupac Murders and was a co-producer on Netflix’s Unsolved documentary on the murders, told The Sun that breakthroughs in these areas could potentially deliver the evidence needed to finally clear the case.

In an exclusive interview with The Sun, Dorsey, who also examines the case in YouTube series Deep Dive: The Biggie and Tupac Case Files, said: “Even solved cases can have loose ends and unanswered questions, and Biggie’s murder is no exception.

"I’m exploring these smaller mysteries connected to this crime because they fascinate me and because sometimes the key to clearing a case is in the small details.

"LAPD hasn’t officially cleared it yet. There are new potential witnesses and other pieces of evidence in my series that could bring the case that much needed closure.”

The first piece of evidence is the presence of a mysterious man in a striped shirt at the Petersen Museum, the night of the killing.


Dorsey said that Biggie's security detail were on alert for “potential troublemakers” as they were “in Death Row Record’s backyard” and as they were leaving, they spotted a mysterious “long sleeved blue and white striped pullover shirt guy” in his late 20s- who stared at Biggie and fellow rapper Puff Daddy “with a mad face” from the parking garage.

"LAPD never figured out who he was," Dorsey said.

"No-one inside or outside the party recognized him."

A fan captured the man on tape, but he has never been identified.

A couple who witnessed the shooting also called 911 and said they had seen a man with a striped shirt crouching down behind a car in the parking garage and it looked like he was holding a gun.

They believed the shooter was the same person they'd seen in the parking garage.

Dorsey said: “To my knowledge, the striped shirt guy is the only person captured in this video to ever be identified by a witness as being one of the suspicious individuals in the garage that night, but they still don’t know who he was."


Dorsey also revealed that former gang shot-caller Keffe D was at the party where Biggie was killed.

Keffe D has previously confessed to his role in the Tupac shooting – claiming to have been in the car full of crips that murdered the rapperin September 1996.

Dorsey says Keffe was not only a guest at the bash, but also sidled up to Biggie’s table.

During their encounter, aides of Biggie say Keffe asked the star whether he or his guards needed extra security because he had concerns about some party guests, and Biggie was preparing to leave.

Dorsey said: “Who else was invited to that party or could have tracked Biggie inside that night?


"Tons of people there were interviewed by detectives, but there were 100s of guests, and dozens more outside who couldn’t get in, and many were not interviewed in full.

Biggie has also been rumored to have visited to the Southside Crips in Compton just hours before his murder.

Earlier in the afternoon before the shooting, Biggie attended a celebrity basketball tournament for charity at Cal State University Dominguez Hills, which was just 3.5 miles from the Southside Crips’ neighborhood in Compton.

Rumors have persisted that Biggie stopped by the Crips’ neighborhood that day, possibly while he was already in the area for the tournament.

Dorsey said: “Biggie arrived at the celebrity tournament too late to get in – the venue was already at capacity, so people got stuck outside.

Five ‘overlooked’ pieces of evidence which could help solve Biggie murder

1: Striped shirt guy:Unidentified man in a striped short caught on camera just before the shooting

2: Keffe D: former Crips gangster who confessed to being in the car from which Tupac was shot dead, was at the party with Biggie before he was shot.

3. FBI surveillance – Biggie was being watched by undercover FBI officers for days before his murder

4: Secret visit to Crips – Biggie attended a basketball event near the Crips neighborhood and it's rumored he visited with the Crips there too

5: Biggie's door auction – cops discovered that the bullet ridden doors from the shooting were up for sale

"An informant later claimed to have seen Biggie seated in his vehicle outside the venue and that a known Southside Crip associate was standing there talking to him.”

But there were also claims from witnesses that Biggie visited the Crips’ neighborhood that day, as well.

Dorsey added: “This was a very sensitive time – just six months after Tupac was murdered, allegedly by one of their gang members.

"In the context of allegations that the Crips were involved in Tupac’s killing, this could have substantially heightened tensions between the gangs, even if the alleged visit turned out to be nothing more than unsubstantiated rumors.

"Biggie’s friends have denied going to Compton. It’s something I’ll explore in a future episode to try to get to the bottom of it."

In another revelation Dorsey reveals how Biggie was secretly under NYPD and Federal surveillance in days before the murder

An NYPD Major Case Squad detective and a Department of Treasury agent had surveillance on an “unspecified” investigation following the entourage of Biggie. That probe saw the New York detectives fly to LA to watch Bad Boy artist Biggie’s movements on the West Coast.

However, Dorsey says that a local gang detective in LA discovered the secret probe during the Soul Train Music Awards the night before Biggie’s murder, passing that info to off-duty LA cops on Biggie’s security team as a safety precaution for them.

After the surveillance operation’s cover was blown, Dorsey says LAPD and NYPD cops spoke revealing that the main New York detective flew back to New York just nine hours before Biggie’s murder.

Dorsey said: “Biggie was on law enforcement’s radar at the time of his death – the NYPD and possibly the IRS and FBI were interested in him and/or his associates."

He added: “There’s no evidence that the FBI or any other law enforcement agency witnessed Biggie’s shooting. And it’s too bad because imagine how differently this case might have gone if the detectives monitoring things at the Soul Train Music Awards had witnessed the shooting the following night. This case might have been solved right then and there.”


Dorsey also points to how the rental car Biggie was shot in, was returned to the rental company, after LAPD had looked at it.

Cops then learned that someone was trying to sell the door riddled with bullet holes.

Dorsey confirms, “On April 29, 1997, less than two months after Biggie’s murder, LAPD RHD Detectives were contacted by a Deputy District Attorney who’d heard the door was going to be auctioned off.

"Somehow, someone had come into possession of the door after the Suburban was returned to the company that owned it.

"The detectives located the door at an auto body shop in Van Nuys, CA, and seized it and stored it in an LAPD evidence warehouse, where I assume it still sits today.”

Dorsey adds, “It’s possible that they didn’t have a buyer in mind yet, if indeed the plan was to auction it. In recent years, the vehicles associated with Biggie and Tupac’s murders have been listed for sale for tons of money…

"On one hand, these objects are morbid pieces of history; on the other hand, that door could’ve become a sort of trophy for anyone involved in Biggie’s death.”

The Sun reached out to LAPD for comment.

For more info on the cases please visit the YouTube series Deep Dive: The Biggie and Tupac Case Files.

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