Coronavirus LIVE news: France and Germany could join Spain on UK's quarantine list as UK deaths hit 45,752 – updates

FEARS are growing that France and Germany could join Spain on the UK's quarantine list after a spike in coronavirus cases.

Thousands of tourists were ordered on Saturday to self-isolate for 14 days on their return from Spain or face a £1,000 fine after Covid-19 cases in the country rose to more than 1,000 a day. 

It comes as Shropshire has seen a new coronavirus outbreak in a caravan park, with 21 people testing positive for the deadly bug.

All residents who have come into contact with one of the positive cases have been asked to self isolate.

And the council fears the number of cases at the site will continue to rise before control measures start to take effect.

Testing started when two positive cases were confirmed at Craven Arms, a market town in Shropshire, last week.

Meanwhile, the latest coronavirus death toll in the UK stands at 45,752.

Follow all the latest coronavirus news and updates below…

  • REPORT FINDS THAT YOUNG BAME MEN MORE LIKELY TO GET COVID FINES THAN WHITE MEN OF SAME AGE

    Young men from black, Asian and ethnic minority (BAME) backgrounds were almost twice as likely to be handed fines for breaches of coronavirus lockdown rules than white men the same age, new figures show.

    A National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC) report published today concluded there has been “disproportionality” in the issuing of fixed penalty notices (FPNs) by forces in England and Wales.

    The analysis by Government statisticians shows those from BAME backgrounds were handed fines at a rate of 1.6 times higher than white people between March 27 and May 25, with black and Asian people 1.8 times more likely to be handed penalties.

  • OVER-40S COULD FACE HIGHER TAXES TO FUND COST OF SOCIAL CARE

    Everyone over the age of 40 could have to pay extra taxes to help fund the cost of their social care in old age.

    Under proposals being looked at by ministers, the PM is considering radical action to try and solve the ongoing issue of how to pay for care for the country's ageing population.

    As part of the plans, which as said to be supported by the Health Secretary Matt Hancock, over-40s would have to pay more in tax or national insurance.

    They could also be made to get insurance against the huge bills people face when they grow older.

    The money would be put towards social care budgets, or cover stays in care homes.

    Read the full report on that here.

  • WHO: IMPOSSIBLE TO KEEP BORDERS SHUT

    WHO emergencies programme head Mike Ryan has said it is impossible for countries to keep borders shut for the foreseeable future.

    He told a virtual briefing in Geneva: “It is going to be almost impossible for individual countries to keep their borders shut for the foreseeable future. Economies have to open up, people have to work, trade has to resume.

    “What is clear is pressure on the virus pushes the numbers down. Release that pressure and cases creep back up”, he added.

  • STURGEON SAYS NHS LOUISA JORDAN IS 'VITAL ASSET'

    First minister Nicola Sturgeon has said that Louisa Jordan hospital remains a “vital asset” even though it has not yet been used to treat Covid-19 patients.

    Since the start of July, a total of 315 patients have had orthopaedic and plastic surgery outpatient consultations at the hospital, which was constructed at the Scottish Events Campus (SEC) in Glasgow to treat coronavirus sufferers.

    Speaking after visiting the hospital, Ms Sturgeon said: “We always hoped that the NHS Louisa Jordan would never be needed for the Covid response and thanks to the continued collective efforts of people across Scotland to suppress the virus, that has been the case.”

    But Sturgeon added that, as NHS services are phased back in, the hospital could still offer a vital service.



  • SOUTH KOREA REPORTS 25 NEW CASES

    Korea reported 25 new cases of COVID-19, bringing its caseload to 14,175 infections and 299 deaths.

    The country's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said today that 16 of the new cases were tied to people arriving from abroad.

    It comes as the country reported dozens of new cases among crew members of a Russia-flagged cargo ship docked in the southern port of Busan.

  • DO KEY WORKERS NEED TO QUARANTINE?

    The UK has closed its travel corridor with Spain over the weekend, meaning everyone returning from holiday must quarantine from now on.

    Anyone returning from a quarantine country must fill out the Public Health passenger locator form and go straight into quarantine on arrival.

    This includes most NHS workers, police and other key workers who were allowed to work during lockdown.

    Unless you are working on very specific international business, you are unlikely to be exempt.

    Holidays do not count either, and therefore you will have to quarantine for two weeks once you get back no matter what you do for a living.

  • ONE PERSON FINED BY POLICE FOR TRAVEL QUARANTINE BREACH

    Just one person has been fined by police for breaching quarantine rules after arriving from abroad, new figures from forces in England and Wales show.

    The data released by the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC) on Monday comes after tourists in Spain were told they would have to self-isolate for 14 days when returning to the UK.

    NPCC chairman Martin Hewitt said enforcement of the regulations, breaches of which can be punished with fines of between £100 and £1,000, is primarily a matter for Border Force and public health officials.

    He said compliance with the rules had been good, but added “it's really difficult to understand how people will respond” after Spain was removed from the UK's list of safe destinations over a spike in the number of coronavirus cases.

    “You would hope that people would come back and be responsible,” he said.

  • GERMANY 'ALREADY BATTLING SECOND WAVE', MERKEL ALLY SAYS

    Germany is already fighting against a second wave of coronavirus, a top ally to Angela Merkel has warned.

    Michael Kretschmer said the infection rates in the new clusters could lead to very high numbers of new cases as Europe sits on a knife edge over the pandemic.

    Mr Kretschmer, the premier of Saxony and a longstanding ally of German Chancellor Merkel, said a second wave is already hitting Germany.

    He said: “The second wave of coronavirus is already here.”

    Germany’s Covid-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic

  • WORLD'S BIGGEST VACCINE STUDY BEGINS

    The world's biggest coronavirus vaccine study so far got underway today, with the first of 30,000 planned volunteers helping to test shots created by the US government.

    The new experimental vaccine is developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc, and is one of several candidates in the global race for a vaccination.

    In this trial, volunteers won't know whether they are getting the real shot or a dummy version.

    After two doses, scientists will closely track which group experiences more infections as they go about their daily routines, especially in areas where the virus still is spreading unchecked.

  • BELGIUM CONCERNED BY SURGE IN INFECTIONS

    Belgian health officials say that coronavirus infections are growing at an alarming rate amid a surge in cases in port city of Antwerp.

    According to the latest figures released today, confirmed cases rose by 71% for the week of July 17-23 compared to the previous week, with 47% of the cases detected in the Antwerp province.

    Numbers are also going up in the rest of the county, with an average of about 279 new confirmed cases per day.

  • TRAVEL EXPERT SLAMMED FOR 'ENCOURAGING VIEWERS TO BREAK QUARANTINE'

    This Morning's travel expert Simon Calder has been slammed online for “encouraging viewers to break quarantine” – with host Ruth Langsford forced to cut him off.

    The 64-year-old travel pro was branded a “danger to public health” as horrified fans watched in shock while he shared loopholes surrounding the new 14-day quarantine Brits face after travelling to Spain.

    Watch that clip below.

  • GLOBAL AIRLINE BODY HITS OUT AT QUARANTINE RULES

    The International Air Transport Association has hit out at the UK government's decision to impose quarantine measures on travellers from Spain, saying it represented a “big setback” for the tourism industry.

    A statement read: “This is a big setback for consumer confidence that is essential to drive a recovery.

    “A unilaterally decided blanket quarantine order for everybody returning to the UK from Spain does not accurately reflect the risk of a regional spike in one corner of the country.”

  • RECORD EMPLOYMENT RISE IN FRANCE AFTER LOCKDOWN

    France saw its biggest ever drop in the jobless total last month, as jobseekers found part-time work following the easing of lockdown, new government data showed.

    The number of people registered at government employment agencies as out of work fell by 204,700 in June – the biggest monthly drop on record – to 4,220,900, the Labour ministry said.

    France's jobless total had surged to a record 4,575,500 in April as new hiring ground to a halt during the coronavirus lockdown that the government put in place in mid-March.

  • FLORIDA OVERTAKES NEW YORK FOR INFECTIONS

    Florida yesterday became the second state after California to overtake New York, the worst-hit state at the start of the coronavirus outbreak in the US, according to a Reuters tally.

    The total number of coronavirus cases in the Sunshine State rose by 9,300 to 423,855 yesterday.

    It is now just one place behind California, which leads the country with 448,497 cases.

    Still, New York has recorded the most deaths of any U.S. state at more than 32,000 with Florida in eighth place with nearly 6,000 deaths.



  • ECONOMIC RECOVERY COULD TAKE UNTIL 2024, SAYS REPORT

    A report from think tank EY claims that recovery from the coronavirus crisis could take 18 months longer than expected.

    The think tank said today in its latest projections economic output is unlikely to return to its 2019 level until the end of 2024 – while it had previously expected GDP to match fourth-quarter 2019 size in early 2023.

    Now, EY predicts that the UK economy will shrink by a record 20% in the April to June quarter, rather than the 15% it forecast last month.

  • FAMED JAZZ CLUB TO REOPEN FOR INDOOR GIGS ON AUGUST 1

    Legendary jazz club Ronnie Scott's is set to reopen for indoor gigs on August 1, it has been announced.

    The venue, a key part of London's cultural life for over 60 years, closed when the country locked down in March.

    This weekend, it will reopen with a capacity of 50 per cent and strict social distancing measures in place.

    There will also be an outdoor space, selling burgers and champagne.

    “It’s great to be back doing what we do,” said Simon Cooke, managing director of Ronnie Scott’s. “We have been looking on enviously whilst restaurants have reopened, especially as the club is laid out like a restaurant.”

    He added: “We have been planning the relaunch for some time so as soon as we got the green light for live performance we moved into action.Our unique structure of seating lends itself to distancing, some may say the added space is an improvement!”

  • EARLIER LOCKDOWN COULD HAVE SAVED LONDON BUS DRIVERS, SAYS REPORT

    An earlier lockdown in England could have saved the lives of many bus drivers, according to a new report into the high death rate of bus drivers in the capital during the pandemic.

    The Guardian reports that male bus drivers in London aged 20 to 65 were 3.5 times more likely to die of coronavirus between March and May then men in other jobs.

    The report, commissioned by TFL and overseen by Sir Michael Marmot from UCL's Institute of Health Equity, said that drivers were at risk due to health conditions caused by their job – with many having high blood pressure.

    “Driving a bus, coach or taxi is among the frontline occupations associated with increased risk of death from Covid-19. Because London was an early centre of the pandemic, it is likely that the increased risk among London bus drivers is associated with exposure”, Professor Marmot said.

  • WHO SAYS COVID-19 IS BY FAR WORST HEALTH EMERGENCY IT HAS FACED

    The coronavirus pandemic that has killed more than 16 million people is easily the worst global health emergency the World Health Organisation (WHO) has faced, its director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said today.

    Only with strict adherence to health measures, from wearing masks to avoiding crowds, would the world be able to beat it, Tedros added at a virtual news briefing in Geneva.

    “Where these measures are followed, cases go down. Where they are not, cases go up,” he said.

    He also praised Canada, China, Germany and South Korea for controlling outbreaks.

  • BCC BOSS SAYS QUARANTINE 'HAMMER BLOW' FOR SPAIN

    The British Chambers of Commerce has said that the snap decision yesterday to reimpose quarantine restrictions on travellers returning to the UK from Spain is a “hammer blow” to the country's tourism industry.

    He said: “Abrupt changes to quarantine measures will be yet another hammer blow for the fragile travel and tourism industries, both here in the UK and overseas.

    “Firms will now have to manage the effects of this unexpected change as returning staff have to quarantine upon their return to the UK. Support measures should be extended to help firms and their employees manage the additional uncertainty generated by this and other government decisions”

    “Businesses will be asking why Spain was on the safe list on Friday, only to be taken off it on Saturday.”

    He added: “Changes to quarantine rules must be communicated clearly by government with as much notice as possible. Continued improvement of the test and trace programme, alongside co-ordinated checks at departure and arrival airports, could alleviate the need for many of these restrictions.”

  • SOME BAME HEALTH WORKERS STILL WAITING FOR COVID-19 RISK ASSESSMENT

    More than a quarter of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) NHS staff are still waiting for a risk assessment for coronavirus, data suggests.

    Figures seen by the Health Service Journal (HSJ) suggest 73% of BAME staff had had a risk assessment in England by July 17, but in some hospital trusts the figure was just 20%.

    Some trusts in the South West are thought to have made poorer progress than the national average, at 65%, the HSJ said.

    NHS England recommended risk assessments for BAME staff as long ago as April and has now extended the deadline for them to be completed to the end of July.

    People from BAME backgrounds are thought to be at higher risk of poor outcomes from coronavirus, with Health Secretary Matt Hancock saying they are “disproportionately” dying from the virus.

  • GOLF CLUB CLOSED AFTER POSITIVE CASES

    A golf club in the town of Barthomley, Cheshire has been forced to close after a member of staff tested positive for coronavirus.

    The Stoke Sentinel reports that Alsager Golf Club took the “difficult decision” to shut following the news.

    Writing on their Facebook page, the golf club said: “Unfortunately, due to a recent case of a member contracting Covid-19, we have made a very difficult decision to close the club again for hopefully a short period.

    “This has not been an easy decision and certainly has not been taken lightly, but given recent events, one we feel prudent to protect both our members and staff until we receive further guidance.

    “As yet, we do not have any further information but will share once we have. We thank you for your patience at this difficult time.”

  • BAVARIA FARM OUTBREAK

    Authorities in the German state of Bavaria are stepping up testing after 170 out of 500 workers at a local farm tested positive for the coronavirus.

    The facility, located in the town of Mamming, has now been put under mandatory quarantine behind a mental fence.

    “We must be careful that the many, many isolated cases in Germany don’t turn into a slight, creeping second wave,” state premier Markus Soeder warned at a news conference earlier today.

    He added: “We cannot completely prevent coronavirus, but our goal must be to identify outbreaks in time to check a wider spread”.

  • THOUSANDS OF DOGS COULD BE ABANDONED DURING PANDEMIC

    A charity has warned that thousands of dogs risk being abandoned due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    The Dogs Trust said that demand for puppies has surged during lockdown, with Google searches for “buy a puppy” rising by 166% since March 23.

    But the charity says that, with a surge in demand, thousands of dogs could be given up or put to sleep should families struggle financially during the crisis.

    The Dogs Trust estimates that we could see around 40,000 or more stray or abandoned dogs in need of help should the country see a financial crash on par with that in 2008.

  • PORTUGUESE AIRLINE TO RESUME FLIGHTS

    Portuguese airline TAP has said it will resume 40% of its pre-coronavirus crisis operations in September, gradually restoring flights after travel demand collapsed in the pandemic.

    TAP was forced to suspend almost all flights in April, and tentatively resumed some flights in May despite low demand.

    TAP said it had about 500 weekly round-trip flights to various destinations scheduled for August and this was expected to rise to 700 in September.

    “The list of routes and flights may be adjusted whenever circumstances require due to the evolution of restrictions in various countries, the pandemic, as well as demand,” TAP said.

  • VIETNAM EVACUATES BEACH CITY

    Around 80,000 people, mostly local tourists, are being evacuated from the popular Vietnamese beach city of Da Nang after four people there were confirmed to have coronavirus this weekend .

    Vietnam reimposed a social distancing order in Da Nang on Sunday following the news.

    The new cases are the first known to be locally transmitted in the country in over three months.

    The Civil Aviation Administration said the country's four airlines have added extra flights and larger planes to transport the people out of the city in central Vietnam.

    It will probably take four days to evacuate the 80,000 passengers, CAA director Dinh Viet Thang said in a statement.

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