Can YOU tell the budget bouquets from the £400 posies?

More bloom for your buck! Aldi and Lidl are selling 100 Valentine’s Day roses from £16 – but can YOU tell the budget bouquets from luxury posies costing £400

  • Valentine’s Day means many will be buying bunches of red roses for loved ones
  • Roses can range from 16p a stem, to £4 for a flower in a more luxurious bouquet
  • FEMAIL rounds up a range of prices to see if you can pick out the budget bunch 

Red roses are a classic symbol of love which will no doubt be enjoyed by many this Valentine’s Day – and florists across the UK today will be cashing in by selling beautiful bouquets that are sure to set shoppers back a hefty sum.

But lovers don’t have to splash out, with budget chains such as Lidl offering up to 100 red roses for as little as £25, and Aldi selling a 12-piece bouquet for £1.99.   

While budget offerings start at as little as 16p per flower, a single stem can set you back £4 if you go for one of the pricier bouquets – but is it worth splashing out?

Here, Femail reveals just some of the offerings available to shoppers  – but can you tell the budget bouquets from the luxury arrangements? 


Femail reveals some of the offerings available to shoppers this Valentine’s season – but can you tell the budget bouquets from the luxury arrangements?

LIDL: 100 RED ROSES FOR £25

Lidl is selling a bunch 100 rose for £25, meaning they’re going for just 25p a piece (pictured)

While a standard bouquet usually has a dozen roses, Lidl is giving customers the chance to dial up the romance with its bunch of 100 stems.

This means they’re just 25p a piece, a fraction of the price of some high-end retailers.

The German chain was voted Fresh Flower Supermarket of the Year 2018 at the Retail Industry Awards, so you should be getting a bargain for your bunch. 

ALDI: 12 ROSES FOR £1.99

Rival supermarket Aldi are selling bouquets of 12, 40cm roses for just £1.99, meaning savvy lovebirds could pick up 96 for just £16

Lidl aren’t the only budget German chain offering a staggering deal.

Rival supermarket Aldi are selling bouquets of 12, 40cm roses for just £1.99, meaning savvy lovebirds could pick up 96 for only £16. 

The blooms have been through a preservation process, which sees the fresh-cut roses treated with a chemical solution that stops growth when they’re in their most beautiful state. 

MOONPIG: 12 ROSES FOR £20

For Valentine’s Day, Moonpig are offering 12 Kenyan Burgundy roses for £20. Their product description says they boast luxurious, full-bodied heads on a 48cm stem

More than just a place to make novelty cards, Moonpig has cemented itself as one of the go-to floral retailers in recent years.

For Valentine’s Day, they’re offering 12 Kenyan Burgundy roses for £20. Their product description says they boast luxurious, full-bodied heads on a 48cm stem. 

The bouquet comes hand-tied by Moonpig’s expert florists and hand-wrapped in frosted cellophane for an extra luxury touch.

Shoppers will be paying just £1.60 a stem, meaning it’s 10 times the cost of Aldi’s – but still a fraction on some luxury retailers. 

APPLEYARD LONDON: 100 RED ROSES FOR £149.99

London-based Florist Appleyard London say their bouquet of 100 red Calypso roses are the ‘prefect opulent gift’ and ‘beautifully romantic’.

London-based Florist Appleyard London say their bouquet of 100 red Calypso roses are the ‘prefect opulent gift’ and ‘beautifully romantic’. 

‘This sumptuous arrangement of 100 red roses is a classic choice for anniversaries, Valentine’s Day, and other romantic occasions,’ according to their website.   

The bouquet comes with a card, and costs £5.99 for delivery.   

INTERFLORA: 100 ROSES FOR £380 

‘Beautifully presented and delivered by hand’ is how they’re described online, but they come in at significantly more than 100 roses from Aldi or Lidl.

These hand-delivered red roses are at the more expensive end of the range, costing £380 for 100 stems.    

They are described as being: ‘Beautifully presented and delivered by hand,’ but they come in at significantly more than getting 100 roses from Aldi or Lidl.

However, they are hand-tied and finished with wrap and ribbon, sure to impress an amour on February 14.

WAITROSE: 100 ROSES FOR £40 

Easy to pick up as you do your weekly shop, Waitrose will no doubt be the go-to for many busy romantics this year

Easy to pick up as you do your weekly shop, Waitrose will no doubt be the go-to for many busy romantics this year.

And their Red Sweetheart Roses may catch the eye of romantics, at £40 for 100 – or 40p a stem. 

The online description states they are a ‘generous armful of roses for a simply stunning romantic gesture. Ready to wow as a large display or arrange into individual posy vases.’

FERGUSON FLOWERS: 100 RED ROSES FOR £400

Coming in at £4 per flower, 25 times the cost of those from Aldi, the Northern Ireland based shop offers same day delivery for the ‘ultimate symbol of love’

For those feeling very flush, high-end retailer Ferguson Flowers are offering a luxurious bouquet of 100 red roses, but it will set you back £400.

However, the hefty price tag is still a third cheaper than last year, where the flowers were £600 for 100 stems. 

Ferguson claim their flowers are ‘marvellous’ and ideal for a loved one.

Coming in at £4 per flower, 25 times the cost of those from Aldi, the Northern Ireland-based shop offers same day delivery for the ‘ultimate symbol of love’. 

The online description reads: ‘An ultimate symbol of love and this beautiful bouquet sent to your loved one will reaffirm all the beautiful feelings that both of you share. ‘ 

CANCER RESEARCH: 12 RED ROSES FOR £30 

For £30 you can pick up a blooming bouquet of 12 red roses from Cancer Research (pictured), with 25 per cent of the proceeds going to the charity

For £30 you can pick up a blooming bouquet of 12 red roses from Cancer Research, with 25 per cent of the proceeds going to the charity.

But at £2.50 a stem, it’s among the more expensive flower arrangements.  

This sturdy long-lasting Rhodos roses come with an average head size of 5cm measured from base of head to the top. 

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