Nepal plans tougher rules for climbing Everest

Nepal plans tougher rules for mountaineers attempting Everest after 11 people died during this year’s climbing season

  • Nepalese government committee has recommended new rules for climbers
  • Said must have climbed a peak higher than 21,320ft before applying for a permit 
  • Climbers would also have to use experienced guide after 11 people died this year 
  • Nine people who died were climbing from the southern side of the peak in Nepal

Climbers hoping to tackle Mount Everest could face tougher rules in the future such as having to have already scaled tall peaks and undergone proper training.

They may also have to possess a certificate of good health and have insurance that would cover rescue costs if required.

A Nepalese government committee formed after a difficult mountaineering season on Everest recommended the series of new rules for mountaineers.

Mountaineers could face tougher rules for climbing Mount Everest after 11 people died on the peak this spring season. Pictured are dozens of climbers waiting at the summit in May

This year 11 people died during the spring climbing season with nine attempting the peak from the southern side of in Nepal, making it one of the worst years on the mountain.

The report, published today, said people must have successfully climbed a peak higher than 21,320ft before they can apply for a permit to scale Mount Everest. 

Each climber would also be required to have a highly experienced guide. 

The government had previously been was criticised for allowing too many climbers on the world’s highest peak.

Colorado lawyer Christopher John Kulish, 62, pictured, became the 11th fatality in less than a fortnight in May after he suffered a heart attack descending the peak


Irishmen Seamus Lawless, 39, (left) and Kevin Hynes, 56, (right) also died descending the peak


Utah-resident Donald Lynn Cash, 55, (left) collapsed after reaching the summit of Everest. British climber Robn Haynes Fisher (right), also died on the mountain this spring season

Mountaineering authorities were also criticised for not stopping inexperienced climbers who had difficulty coping with harsh conditions on Everest and slowed down other climbers on the trail to the 29,035ft summit.

The spring climbing season began in March and ended in May. The government is expected to amend its mountaineering regulations following the recommendations.

Colorado lawyer Christopher John Kulish, 62, became the 11th fatality in less than a fortnight in May after he suffered a heart attack descending the peak.

He is believed to have fallen gravely ill after successfully reaching the 29,029-foot summit among a ‘small group and no crowds’.

The new report suggests people should have successfully climbed a peak higher than 21,320ft before they can apply for a permit to scale Mount Everest (pictured)

Bottlenecks, tiredness and exhaustion, exacerbated by crowded routes and ‘traffic jams’ to and from the summit were previously believed to be behind the spike in deaths.

Irish professor Seamus Lawless, Donalyd Lynn Cash, 55, from Utah, Irishman Kevin Hynes, 56, and Robin Haynes Fisher, 44, are some of the others who died on Everest in May.

Before them, four Indians, one Austrian and one Nepalese person also died going up or down the peak.

The 11 climbers who have died on Everest during the spring season

May 16: Irish professor Séamus Lawless went missing on May 16 after reportedly falling.

The search operation has since been called off and he is presumed dead.

May 22: Dedicated amateur Donald Lynn Cash, 55, from Sandy, Utah, collapsed and died

May 24: Irishman Kevin Hynes, 56, passed away on the northern Tibet part of the mountain.

The father-of-two died in his tent at 23,000ft on the descent after turning back before reaching the top.

May 25: Robin Haynes Fisher, 44, collapsed and died only 150m from the peak.

May 27: American patent lawyer Christopher John Kulish, 61, dies after descending

May: Four Indians, one Austrian and one person from Nepal died on Everest.

Source: Read Full Article